Frequently asked questions

 

When will the house, garden, farmyard and adventure playground open in 2014?

The house, garden, farmyard and adventure playground are open every day from 16 March to 23 December 2014.

What are the age ranges for tickets?

Adult Ages 17 - 59
Senior Citizen
Ages 60 and over
Student 16 and over and in full time education
Child 4 – 16 inclusive and children 3 and under are free. Except our farmyard child tickets which are 3 – 16 inclusive and children 2 and under are free.
Family Two adults and three children

Are Dogs allowed in the garden?

Dogs are permitted in the garden and parkland but must be kept on a lead, particularly in the park because of free range livestock. Dogs are sadly not allowed in the house, or farmyard and adventure playground, but there are posts to tie dogs up for a short time outside the farmyard.  We do not advise that you leave your dog in your car. Assistance dogs such as guide dogs, are allowed in the house.

Is Chatsworth a National Trust, English Heritage or HHA property?

Chatsworth is not part of the National Trust, English Heritage or HHA so standard admission prices apply. Detail of prices can be found on the tickets & prices page.

Do you you offer a HM Forces discount?

We offer 2 for 1 entry to the house & garden as a special offer to HMS Forces. To take advantage of this offer, you will need to log on to www.rewardsforforces.co.uk and print out the Chatsworth voucher.

Is the Hudson's Heritage Explorer Pass accepted at Chatsworth?

Yes, we do accept the Hudson's Heritage Explorer Pass against our 'house and garden ticket'. The Hudson's Heritage Explorer Pass is not valid for groups of 10 people or more.

Does Chatsworth offer discount for carers?

We offer free admission to carers. Do not include carers when booking online as they will be given complimentary admission on arrival. If you should need any access assistance, please email us or call us on 01246 565300.

How long does it take to go around the house?

We recommend an hour and a half to be able to see everything in the house. 

Are bags, pushchairs or mobility scooters allowed in the house?

We cannot allow large bags, rucksacks, prams, pushchairs or mobility scooters into the house. We do offer a limited supply of alternative baby carrying equipment.

Is photography permitted at Chatsworth?

Photography is permitted for non-commercial and personal use. Tripods and lighting equipment are not permitted. Photoshoots must be arranged in advance with the Chatsworth Marketing Department.

Wedding photography is exclusive to couples getting married at Chatsworth. Visitors dressed in wedding attire will not be allowed access to the house and garden. Professional portrait and engagement photography is not permitted at Chatsworth without the prior written consent of the marketing department.

Visitors taking part in any wedding, engagement or professional portrait photography on site will be asked to leave.

Is there an online shop?

At this time we are unable to ship our products. We are working extremely hard to expand e-commerce at Chatsworth and hope to have it up and running as soon as possible.

I came to see a particular piece from the collection - where is it?

We have an active programme of exhibitions and loans, meaning that although we always have something exciting to see, we cannot guarantee that all of our most well-loved paintings will be on public view all year.

How do you get a trade stand?

Enquiries relating to the Country Fair should be sent to info@chatsworthcountryfair.co.uk

Enquiries regarding the Christmas markets should be sent to simon@eventmen.co.uk

Enquiries regarding the Horse Trials should be sent to info@chatsworthhorsetrials.co.uk

Why is the Duke the Duke of Devonshire instead of the Duke of Derbyshire?

William Cavendish, second son of Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, was granted the title of Earl of Devonshire in 1618, and the 4th Earl of Devonshire was granted the title of Duke of Devonshire in 1694. The title of Earl of Derby was not available, having been granted to the Stanley family in 1485, so it was simply a matter of granting William Cavendish a vacant title. It is not unusual for there to be little or no connection between a person's title and the area in which his family live. The Earls of Derby owned property in Lancashire and are particularly associated with Liverpool, and the Dukes of Norfolk have their seat at Arundel, in Sussex, and owned extensive property in Sheffield. To complicate the picture, the title of Earl of Devon was subsequently revived in 1831, and this is now held by the Courtenay family whose residence is Powderham Castle, in Devon.